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Process Fundamentals

Process Fundamentals-I

 

Process Fundamentals-II

 

The Process Fundamentals simulation is a series of rigorous and high-fidelity process equipment models that provide a realistic response for process dynamics, equipment principles, operating principles and process control.

 

Envision Systems Process Fundamentals-1
Copyright © 2009 by EnVision Systems Inc. All rights reserved worldwide.

Process Fundamentals-I

Pipe Flow Network:

This model consists of two pipes connected via a T-Junction to a single pipe. Water is used as the fluid medium. The trainee learns about the dynamics of flow, pressure, temperature, mass and heat balance and process control.

 

Tank and a Pump:

This model consists of a tank and pump. Flow enters the tank under tank level control and leaves the tank under flow control. Water is used as the fluid medium. The trainee learns about pump and motor dynamics and tank level control.

Single Phase Heat Exchanger:

This model consists of a typical single-phase heat exchanger with a bypass line on one flow. Hot and cold water are used as fluid medium. The trainee learns about heat exchanger principles and commonly used temperature control strategies.

Tank, Pumps and a Heat Exchanger:

This integrated model consists of tank, pumps and heat exchanger with various control strategies. Hot water is cooled by cold water at a heat exchanger before entering the tank with a level-flow cascade control. Flow leaving the tank is pumped under a flow control. The trainee learns about normal, startup, shutdown and troubleshooting operations.

 

Envision Systems Process Fundamentals-2
Copyright © 2009 by EnVision Systems Inc. All rights reserved worldwide.

Process Fundamentals-II

Mixer with Heating Jacket:

This simulated experiment explains the principles of component mass and heat balance.

 

The simulation model consists of a stirred tank with a heating coil. Water and methanol streams enter the tank under flow control and are well mixed. The mixture temperature is controlled via heating coil, heated by hot water. The heated mixture from the tank is pumped by a pump under tank level control.

 

Flash Drum:

This simulated experiment explains the principles of vapor-liquid equilibrium.

 

The simulation model consists of a flash drum, heat exchanger and pump. A mixture of water and methanol is first heated in a heat exchanger under temperature control and then enters a flash drum. The mixture is flashed based upon the drum pressure, and the liquid and vapor are separated. The vapors leave the drum under drum pressure control, while the liquid leaves the bottom under drum level control.

 

Kettle Type Reboiler:

This simulated experiment explains the principles of a kettle-type reboiler.

 

The simulation model consists of a typical kettle-type reboiler and steam condenser pot. A mixture of water and methanol enters the reboiler at the bottom on the shell side and vaporize by condensing steam on the tube side. The water-methanol liquid level in the reboiler is controlled by means of bottom draw flow control. The reboiler heat duty is controlled by steam flow control. The condensed steam enters a condenser pot, where the condensed water level is controlled by condensate draw at the bottom.

 

Reflux Drum with Overhead Condenser:

This simulated experiment explains the principles of a typical overhead vapor condenser and a split-range pressure control strategy.

 

The simulation model consists of an overhead condenser and reflux drum, common to a typical distillation column. A hot vapor mixture of water and methanol under flow control splits into two streams. One stream enters a water-cooled condenser where the vapor mixture condenses and sub-cools, while the other stream bypasses the condenser and enters the reflux drum directly. The reflux drum pressure is controlled by a split range pressure controller. The condensed liquid leaves reflux drum under level control.

 

Centrifugal Compressor:

This simulated experiment explains the principles of a typical centrifugal compressor.

 

The simulation model consists of a typical centrifugal compressor with the suction and discharge tank. Hydrogen gas is compressed in single stage centrifugal compressor driven by a variable speed motor. The compressed hydrogen leaves under flow control. A spill back control strategy is used for compressor surge protection. A speed control is provided to control the speed of the compressor.

 

Reciprocating Compressor:

This simulated experiment explains the principles of a typical reciprocating compressor.

 

The simulation model consists of a typical reciprocating compressor with the suction and discharge tank. Hydrogen gas is compressed in single stage reciprocating compressor driven by a motor. The compressor has capacity control to vary the compression volume. The compressed hydrogen leaves under flow control. A spill back line is provided to control the discharge drum pressure.

 

Steam Turbine with Condenser:

This simulated experiment explains the principles of a typical steam turbine with a water-cooled condenser and an eductor system, using a steam ejector.

 

The simulation model consists of a typical steam turbine, water-cooled condenser and steam ejector. The exhaust steam from the turbine is condensed in a water-cooled condenser. The condensed water accumulates at the bottom in a hot well. The condensed water leaves the hot well under level control. The steam turbine shaft is connected to a load with a user settable load control. The load could be from a compressor, generator or some other source.

 

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